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Student Symposium

37th Annual Holocaust Education Symposium for High School Students

Exploring the Evidence: Bearing witness to the greatest crime ever committed by architects

The Neuberger is excited to present its annual High School Student Symposium on the Holocaust in partnership with the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) as part of its signature Holocaust Education Week programming. This year’s annual High School Student Symposium on the Holocaust features a comprehensive exploration of The Evidence Room exhibit currently on view at the ROM. The installation at the ROM was co-curated by a team from the University of Waterloo School of Architecture including O’Donovan Director Anne Bordeleau, architecture professors Donald McKay and Robert Jan van Pelt, Waterloo alumna and project manager Piper Bernbaum and students. The exhibit consists of lifesized reconstructions and casts of key pieces of architectural evidence (a gas column and a gas-tight hatch, a gas chamber door, blueprints, architects’ letters, contractors’ bills and photographs). The exhibit provides irrefutable evidence of the deadly role that architects played in enabling the Holocaust.

A keynote presentation will contextualise the role of Auschwitz-Birkenau in the Holocaust and prepare students to engage with this historically significant exhibition. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to discover, uncover and explore the history of Holocaust through first-person accounts and primary sources in specialized, interactive workshops.

Registration includes pre-visit materials and receive resource materials at the symposium.

Choose between November 21, November 23, OR 28
Registration at 9:00 AM | Program from 9:30 AM–2:30 PM
Royal Ontario Museum | 100 Queen’s Park  | Toronto
416–631–5689

For more information, contact Michelle.

Generously supported by Fred z"l & May Karp and family.

* The symposium is NOW FULL. Please fill out the form below to be added to the waitlist. Should any spots be made available you will be contacted. 

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